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Am I allowed to sell the 3D printing/printed models that I create using your STL files?

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7 comments

  • Kirby Stu

    Gambody can't actually enforce this. They are in a legally grey area anyway as they are making a profit off copyrighted IPs. There is absolutely nothing stopping you from modifying the file, such as scrubbing the godawful gambody.com logo off them, and selling them on from there.

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  • Brian Taylor

    Hello and thank you for leaving a comment!

    There is another article in this Knowledge Base section dedicated to the copyright and license matters on our marketplace: https://gambody.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/360020115992. You may take a look at the information and links that the article includes and let us know at support@gambody.com if anything is unclear.

    As regards the logo embossed on the platforms of some of the older 3D printing models on our marketplace, it could be easily removed by our Moderation team upon the customer's request. As you may not know yet, once you make a purchase of STL files of a 3D printing model on Gambody marketplace, you are also provided with lifetime full technical support for this model. So if you want to have your model cut (or cut otherwise) for better printing, or you'd like some parts to be remodelled or have the embossed logo removed, you can always contact us, and we will do all these for you.

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  • Kirby Stu

    You're duplicating artwork from IPs owned by other companies and selling STLs of it, complete with a name that is the same as said IPs. I think you'll find you are definitely in a legally grey area.

     

     

    "What can you legally do when it comes to printing fan art?

    The basic law is that whoever holds the copyright to a certain thing has the sole right to make and sell “derivative works” , including sequels, based on the original concept. Even characters in a book or plot elements can have copyright protection. Fan fiction can definitely be considered a “derivative work”.

    So does that mean that no fan art is allowed ever? Not necessarily.

    Generally, you don’t want to do anything that would cause confusion as to whether or not a product is official. One thing that is usually fair game is a parody or a criticism, or something that is highly transformative. The more different it is from the original, the stronger your case is that your fan art falls under fair use laws.

    Still, even when that line is crossed, there aren’t a huge number of trademark disputes over fan creations — but they do happen from time to time.

    If you’re planning on making money off of your fan art, then they are more likely to happen. Still, fan art usually doesn’t harm the original creation, so copyright holders aren’t as likely to go after fans. It also isn’t typically a popular move with fans of the work, and can lead to backlash (famous Interview with the Vampire writer Anne Rice is a famous example of this). Avoid logos or trademarked names, as those are also more likely to lead to trouble."

     

    So tell me, have you got consent from Disney for the Darth Vader or Mandalorian STLs you have uploaded? I imagine you don't. What about Bethesda for the Vault Boy STLs? Bet that's a big fat nope. Consent from the Tolkien estate for the Sauron statue? Hmm, I wonder...

     

    If you were giving them out for free, then there'd be a lot less issues, but don't lie and say you are legally allowed to create derivatives from other people's work and sell them on.

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  • Brian Taylor

    Thank you for getting back to us!

    As you might have already read in one of the answers provided by Gambody, the copyright on the digital file (STL) that the 3D artist creates from scratch using modelling/sculpting skills is indeed owned by this 3D artist who uses the advancement of the novel 3D printing technology to create unique digital files drawing inspiration from well-known elements of the modern media culture.

    Content that is offered on Gambody is STL files only and we do have a license as well as permission from our contributing 3D artists that allows us to offer these files on our marketplace and grant the customers access to these files in exchange for the author’s commission. License both for the STL files and the resulting product that we've got presupposes only personal use. So as long as this product is being used solely for personal purposes it doesn't need any licenses that presuppose commercial distribution that the physical products you see in stores do. 

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  • Kirby Stu

    You seem to have absolutely no idea how these licences work.

     

    Let's try again. Do the users have consent from the copyright holders to create and sell artistic reproductions of their work? A simple yes or no will suffice.

     

    I don't care about people selling 3D models, but how dare you tell users they are not allowed to sell prints of the work when the users should not legally be selling 3D models of copyrighted characters.

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  • Brian Taylor

    Kirby,

    we highly appreciate your deep concern about the matter!

    As we've mentioned before, all STL files that are available on Gambody marketplace were created from scratch by our contributing 3D artists who dedicate much time and effort in order to bring to life future 3D printing projects.

    You might be interested in looking through the videos on Gambody's YouTube playlist titled "What is Gambody?": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL840Upc5TaYRNzwoQzn0ixpbiBmKGtaAP. Most of the videos in this playlist feature clips from every single step that the preparation of any high-quality model or figurine takes.

    And the copyright on the digital file (STL) that the 3D artist creates from scratch using modelling/sculpting skills is indeed owned by this 3D artist who offers it to 3D printing enthusiasts for personal use only in exchange for the author's commission.

    But if any of the customers happen to engage in commercial activity using the resulting product they would violate both the Regular Permission that the STL files come with and could breach the licenses that cover only physical items. Therefore, due to the fact that Gambody deals only with STL files and has nothing to do with physical items, the responsibility for the distribution of the resulting products without any respective license for doing so bears the distributor personally.

    We wish you enjoy your 3D printing hobby and work only with 3D printing models and figurines that meet your expectations!

     

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  • Kirby Stu

    It was a yes or no question and you failed to answer.

     

    Let's try again. Do the users have consent from the copyright holders to create and sell artistic reproductions of their work? A simple yes or no will suffice.

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